4 years in: this blog is truly Never Stationary

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4 years ago, on October 8th, 2012, I was a junior, sitting in my bedroom late at night signing up for a WordPress account.

I was thinking to myself, wouldn’t it be cool if I had a place where I could post articles for other people to read? Nothing big, but just somewhere I could refine my language so that other people besides myself could follow my train of thought.

Beyond just my own personal development, this blog has also been never stationary. I used to tell myself that I’d never pay money for special WordPress services – I broke that promise a year or so ago. Now, it’s also become a portfolio for me to show off my writing abilities.

My writing style, the type of content I create and the frequency at which I update my blog has changed since I’ve gone to college, met all sorts of different people and undergone a pretty drastic personality and lifestyle change.

And with all of these new experiences, comes new ideas about how I can incorporate them into my blog.

Whether you’ve known me since high school or if you met me last week or if we’ve never met in person at all, thanks for reading. It’s been quite a ride.


I had a few private blogs back in the day, where I used to rant about boy problems and talk about my day and discuss (primarily with myself, but also with friends with whom I shared the link/password) whatever was on my mind.

Never Stationary had a timid birth. It grew as I shared select articles on Facebook. People saw me writing feverishly and typing methodically at school and asked what I was doing. Peers – the most unexpected of people – started telling me that they had read my blog post the other night, that they enjoyed what I wrote about debate or my favorite novel.

I found a community on WordPress, filled with blogs I eagerly followed, read and commented on. I had an alarm set for every Monday at 11:55AM so I could comment with a question and request feedback on WordPress’ Community Pool post, where hundreds of fellow WordPress bloggers congregated to share, comment and help each other out.

I subscribed to writing prompt websites and free-wrote for an hour or so, answering the questions posed with as much candor and honesty as I could. I also published subpar poetry, drawing on my love for rhymes and clever phrasing to hash out my angsty, adolescent thoughts.

As the months passed, the volume of content grew. I experimented with ways to organize my writing and document whatever was happening in my life. More than that, however, I used it as a place to discuss things that were troubling to me. It became a place where I would take my long, fiery rants and translate them into shorter, 700-word pieces that attempted to leave readers with a lesson, or at least some sort of larger point.

It became an extracurricular activity, to the point that I put it on my college application, wrote my Common App essay about it and spent time planning and writing during class (oops). Second to debate, it was where I spent most of my time and energy.

My mom would always say that I never really had to convince myself to blog – I would consistently find the drive, the means to write something.

 

 

 

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