Tagged: blogging

A loss for words

Did you miss me?

I’m back in your inbox, your feed, etc. It’s been a few days since I’ve posted, and even over the past few weeks, content has been pretty sparse, for a few reasons: midterms, hefty weekend plans, and in general, lots of big changes happening in my life.  Continue reading

Guest Posts Rock, and You Should Consider Submitting One

brain blast

Guest posts are magical, and if you check out the ones that I have already posted on this blog under “Other Voices,” you might understand why.

Never Stationary is just my tiny slice of the huge internet pie; the gathering of people sharing their opinions is replicated constantly, and all over this terrain.

New blogs can emerge because someone wrote for another blog and decided that they wanted their own slice of pie.

Continue reading

A Day in the Life of a High School Blogger

home

Everyday I roll out of bed, refreshed, at 6 am.

Tiptoeing downstairs, I pour myself a cup of tea and sit out on the porch for two hours in a earth-toned shawl, writing in my moleskin notebook.

By the time I’m done, I’ve got a few pages filled with high-quality writing.

Then I clean up the kitchen, head to yoga, and…. Continue reading

8 steps to write a blog for others

Do not be fooled! This is a tattoo.

Do not be fooled! This is a tattoo.

8. Don’t tell stories. That’s what parties are for. Stories require personal interaction; a screen between you and your reader is hardly sufficient to create a meaningful interpersonal connection.

No one wants to read about your life. You didn’t click on this link because you want to hear about my day or know about my life, do you? (In the rare instance that you do, thank you – I love you!)

But the majority want information for themselves; they read when there’s something in it for them, they click when my words offer them some incentive. It’s less of a selfish intention and more of a tendency of human nature.

It’s just something to keep in mind if you want your writing to connect with others. Stories are fine, as long as they are anecdotes, structured to demonstrate a broader point that people can relate to. Continue reading

6 reasons why blogging sucks (and writing in general)

overthink6. You never know if your substance is appropriate.

There are so many facts about my personal life that I’m tentative to reveal here. My last name? Where I live? What school I’m going to? Names of my friends? Romantic details? These are all sensitive topics; I’m previewing what kind of backlash I might get every time I write a This Kid I Know. Continue reading

I Sort of Cringe When I Reread Old Posts

Featured picture is somewhat irrelevant but I just like cats, so.

 

I’ve always tried to be very strict with myself concerning this blog.

I make spelling mistakes and grammar mistakes. It’s true.

It will be very early in the morning and I will be doing the Daily Prompt.

It could be very late at night (maybe 2:33 AM) and I could be just writing furiously about who knows what.

Sometimes, it’s not really about whether you watch your comma splices and run-ons; whether or not you spell it “principle” or “principal” can be almost irrelevant. Sometimes, it’s more about the vocabulary that you choose to use.

Gossamer.

Malaise.

Rustic.

Coterie.

Vesuviate.

Sometimes, even the vocabulary that you pick becomes negligible and it’s more about the raw thoughts that you manage to capture in ink.

So excuse me if sometimes I let a run-on slip past me; please forgive the occasional spelling error that arises from my rushing to write down every image that enters my mind!

Now that I’ve admitted my problems, I’ll also acknowledge that the way that I conduct this blog is very specific, and it is very severe.

I have reread my previous posts time and time again. Some are well-written – clearly dictated, flowing smoothly, and precisely opinionated.

Others though? They sound childish. They sound…incomplete. Some are biased and written from one point of view – and it could be quite obvious if you read it for yourself.

Some have spelling errors. Some have places that don’t make sense because I probably forgot to actually type a word.

Confession: I actually don’t proofread many of my posts. Is that bad?

Revision is good, that is for sure. But if you’re racing against the clock minutes before the start of class, is it acceptable to just click Publish and let your words make their way into cyberspace, for anyone who wants to read it?

I suppose. I could be stricter with the editing and revising that I do for my posts, but what I lack in pre-publishing I make up in post-publishing.

I won’t touch my previous posts. I won’t fix the spelling errors and grammatical faults, but they aren’t much of a slap to the face.

Rather, they are an indication of who I was at a particular time. I will force myself NOT to add pictures to posts without any (the first 10 or so, before I made the homepage centered about the images attached to a post). I will force myself not to go back and change my opinion. I won’t delete a post without any legitimate reasoning. I won’t be ashamed of the things that I’ve written, as long as they are arbitrarily respectful to anyone who chooses to read this blog.

I’ll keep everything the same – the picture, the content, the tags, the title.

To go along with the theme, this blog is Never Stationary. It is also never stationary. It is constantly changing, and I want to keep everything that I write in the past to document my progress. I think that in general, the only trend that this blog will show is improvement. Improvement of what, you ask?

Vocabulary. Cohesiveness of thoughts. Appropriate length. Relatability (actually just made up that word). Etc. etc. etc. Oh and of course, the occasional grammar/spelling error. Logistics.

Today, before I posted this, I skimmed it quickly and read it aloud to myself. Yay! Progress!